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Author Topic: SATA support in 2.4.29 kernel  (Read 3583 times)

Offline shubhro2

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SATA support in 2.4.29 kernel
« on: January 18, 2006, 07:35:07 AM »
Dear guys,
I am having difficulty in patching the SATA patch for kernel 2.4.29. plz help. I recently downloaded the patch but i don't know which file to patch. Can any body help me out??? I am using Turbolinux 10 on an HP machine (p4 2.8 Ghz with a SATA hard disk)

Offline Ricky

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SATA support in 2.4.29 kernel
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2006, 08:07:55 AM »
Can you provide us the link of the patch you downloaded ?

Offline shubhro2

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SATA support in 2.4.29 kernel
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2006, 03:11:08 PM »
Thank you! for responding . I have solved the problem with patching. Thank you! once again!!

Offline gauravbajaj

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SATA support in 2.4.29 kernel
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2006, 12:41:02 AM »
Hi shubhro2...
Can u please share the information of  "SATA Support  in Linux"  through Tutorials  in "linuxsolved.com"?

It will be helpful to  others . :)

Thx

Regards
Gaurav Bajaj

Offline shubhro2

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SATA support in 2.4.29 kernel
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2006, 04:18:59 PM »
I downloaded patch for source code and patched the souce code. After that I recompiled the source code. The newly bilt kernel gave me the SATA support. For more information on patching plz refer to the following tutorial--

How to Apply Kernel Patches
With each new kernel release, there is a corresponding 'patch' The simplest way to patch your kernel is to follow the directions in the Kernel HOWTO - Patching your kernel.
How to Apply the Unofficial Kernel Patches
Patches are easy to apply, once you understand a few simple concepts:

Patches are usually for a specific version of the kernel. This means old patches may not work with newer kernels.
Patches are generally built from 'clean' unpatched kernel sources. So, one patch may make a change that causes other patches to fail.
Patches are not part of the released kernel tree, thus do not be suprised it they don't work. Always keep a backup of your original kernel source!
Now, on to applying the patches. Normally all you need to do is simply issue the following command:

patch -p0 < patch-file-name-here

This should be done from the /usr/src directory.

Sometimes, the patch authors do not include the full path to the files that are being patched, in this case you will need to change to the directory that contains the file. Simply look at the patch file, in the first few lines you should see something like this:

--- drivres/block/rd.c.orig Tue Jul 2 17:08:41 1996
+++ drivres/block/rd.c Mon Sep 30 19:24:06 1996

This tells you that the file being patched is drivers/block/rd.c and the relative path from the /usr/src/ directory is included. But if you see something like this:

--- isdn_common.c~ Fri Nov 22 21:33:10 1996
+++ isdn_common.c Mon Mar 31 01:46:57 1997


This tells you that you will need to find the file isdn_common.c and change to the directory containing this file before you apply the patch.